Borcht Salad for a Hanukkah Latke Party

12-21-14-CA-LA-Lyndia's latkethon-borcht salad

Tomorrow I am going to the Hanukkah latkethon of Lyndia Lowy, my friend-since-we-were-12, who has been frying potato pancakes (and carrot, cauliflower, sweet potato, and zucchini pancakes) for weeks (and freezing them). Usually fifty or more of her best friends show up. Our tradition is that I bring a massive tossed salad of my own recipe, which, because of its similarity of ingredients to borcht soup, I call Borcht Salad.

My feeling is: If everything else on the menu is oily, hot, starchy and golden in color, then the complementary dish should be cool, crunchy, spicy, sweet, sour and deep maroon and purple. And made from organically grown produce. I use a Champion Juicer without the lower screen or plate, so the veggies are quickly shredded by the rotating blades. A food processor with shredding set-up works well, too. The Champion Juicer just makes it, well, juicier. However, it does NOT mince the red onion much at all; that job is best done with a good sharp food prep knife.

Unless I have a huge serving bowl, I like to prepare the vegetables ahead in four equal bagsful, so that the next salad can be quickly put together when the serving dish is empty, or served in four bowls along a banquet table.

Machine grate and divide into four parts in four zipper bags:
3 large beets, peeled and cut into long pieces that will fit into the round hopper of the Champion Juicer.
5 pounds of carrots, scrubbed and tops and tips cut off
3 pounds of daikon radish (optional), scrubbed and tops and tips cut off
1 whole, small red cabbage, with the stem removed, cut into long pieces that will fit into the round hopper of the Champion Juicer.
1 whole, small red onion, peel and top removed, cut in quarters

In 4 separate bags, place:

4 whole red leaf lettuces: each leaf washed and dried in salad spinner, then torn into pieces by hand.

To assemble: pour the contents of one bag of shredded vegetables and one bag of torn lettuce into a large serving bowl and toss with extra virgin olive oil, balsamic vinegar, sea salt and black pepper.

How to Make a Lace Snowflake

12-07-11-AZ-home-decorated tree-details

HereÂ’s how an antimacassar (a lace doily, often affixed to the arms and backs of overstuffed chairs, in bygone eras) can be made into a lace ornament for a Christmas tree. At a crafts store, buy a bottle of stiffening agent. Lay some waxed paper on a table, put the antimacassar on top, and paint the stiffening agent on both sides of it. Let it dry on the waxed paper (and wash the stiffening agent out of your brush!) When itÂ’s dry, it will hang perfectly flat. A small paperclip, unbended into an S shape, makes a good hanger for it.

My friend Randy Carnefix explained how these doilies got their peculiar name. A century ago, many men used an oily hair dressing made in Makassar, Indonesia, from coconut or palm fruit oil, perfumed with essential oil of frangipani (plumeria) blossoms. In an effort to protect their appolstered chairs from the greasy heads and fingers of men thus groomed, housekeepers began placing lace or embroidered pieces of cloth on the backs and arms of their chairs. When styles changed, the antimacassars began to show up in thrift shops.  That’s where I found the ones hanging on my tree.

Winter Roasted Vegetables

IMG_1630
                  Vegetables ready to bake.

Preheat oven to 400 F. I used organic beets, carrots, parsnips, red potatoes, and Brussels sprouts, cleaned and cut in larger-than-bite-sized pieces, arranged on parchment paper that was lightly painted with organic virgin coconut oil (after being placed on a cookie sheet.) Next I brushed the vegetables with more coconut oil, and then placed branches of fresh rosemary around them. In my oven, the baking time was 25 minutes, but yours may cook faster. I tested the vegetables from time to time with a long cooking fork. When tender, they are done! Served them hot, drizzled with organic extra virgin olive oil and a tiny bit of sea salt.

IMG_1632
                                 Vegetables after baking.

 

Cranberry Relish a la Persephone

11-24-11-AZ-home-cranberry pomegranite relish

Thanksgiving recipe:
I invented a new twist on cranberry relish. I mix 8 ounces of thawed whole (organically grown) cranberries and all of the seeds of a fresh (organically grown) pomegranate in a bowl, and pour over them a steaming cup of unsweetened (organicallly grown) cranberry (or pomegranate) juice (sweetened with a couple dropper fulls of stevia glycerite) inwhich a heaping tablespoon of agar flakes have been dissolved (simmer 3 to 5 minutes over a medium flame). One hour in the fridge and it becomes cranberries and pomegranate in aspic.

What Did the Hippies Want?

ABL and Karin Lease in BOTS illustration

I wrote this essay at the request of curator Neil Kramer, with whom I co-founded the (now defunct) online Hippie Museum. I still find it posted on various sites around the Internet – evidently it struck a chord with other people who lived in those times.

What Did The Hippies Want?

by Alicia Bay Laurel
November 19, 2001

We wanted intimacy– not a neighborhood where you didn’t know anyone on the block, or you competed, kept up with the Joneses.

A hunter-gatherer or early agricultural community meant that people lived, worked and sought deeper contact with the holy spirit as a group, and they all knew one another, from cradle to grave.

I used to call my hippie friendships “a horizontal extended family,” as opposed to the ancient tribal extended family,
which was multi-generational, and therefore, vertical.

We wanted a culture which acknowledged the human body, not just for sex, but to hug each other, to be naked without shame, to revere the body with natural foods, beneficial exercise, herbs, baths, massage, deep understanding. This was not part of the culture from which we came. We wanted a culture that thrived on gift-giving. We hitchhiked, shared our food and drugs, gave away our possessions. People who could afford to buy land invited others who could not to live there.

We opened free stores, free clinics, free kitchens, not just in the Haight, but everywhere we went. We wanted be living proof that God(dess) was taking care of us and therefore there was no need to hoard.

We wanted to live without the constraints of time. We wanted to wake up each day and decide what would be the most fun to do that day –or just find out as it went along. We wanted to go with the flow, follow our bliss, be here now.
This was in complete opposition to the culture from which we came.

We wanted new ways to value one another, rather than by wealth, status, looks, achievements, machismo, as our culture of origin had taught us, and continues to teach us through the media. We wanted to value one another for being lovable and real.

We valued spiritual depth, which we referred to as “heavy.” We admired one another for being happy. We admired those who offered selfless service or peaceful resolution of conflict. We wanted a spirituality that actually caused you to grow as a person, not one in which people attended religious gatherings for social status. We wanted to be guided by our own Inner Spirits, rather than by priests.

We thirsted for the spiritual awareness and grace we experienced on psychedelics, without psychedelics, or in addition to them. Many hippies would spend their last cent on a weekend workshop that promised to “change your life forever.”
That was how so many gurus found followers in those days.

We wanted to live in harmony with the earth, the plants and animals, the indigenous peoples of the earth, with each other, with ourselves. We were the fuel behind the rapid expansion of the environmental movement. We experimented with living arrangements that we thought would harmonize with nature. We sought out indigenous tribal elders as our teachers.

We wanted to make the things we wore and used with our hands, grow our food and medicine, feel all kinds of weather–
all the experiences our modern urban lives had excluded in the name of convenience and comfort. We wanted to live on the road, have adventures, build things that hadnÂ’t been built before, and live in them.

We wanted to live our mythic selves, give ourselves names that resonated with our souls, dress in costumes that expressed our dreams, do daring deeds, dance as if no one was looking, decorate our homes with magical things,
listen to music that took us out of ordinary reality into altered states of awareness.

We wanted to see life without violence. We wanted media that contained truth. Some of us risked our lives to find out what the government was doing and let the underground press know. We wanted to talk about things in print that we were not allowed to discuss in our culture of origin.

We wanted to live without stupid, arbitrary rules, either for ourselves or for our children. Some of our children, as adults today, say they wish we had been more protective of them, or offered more structure. We only knew what we endured, being as culturally different from our culture of origin as Chinese are from Italians, and punished for it, and wished to spare our children these experiences. However, some portion of kids raised by hippie parents grew up to be hippies themselves. At that point, one can say, a new culture was born and continues.

Learn to Sing "Last Night I Had the Strangest Dream" in English and in Japanese

“Last Night I Had the Strangest Dream” is a great peace song written by the late folksinger and peace activist Ed McCurdy in response to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and copyrighted in 1950. I first heard it as a child on Pacifica Radio, the peace radio network created by the US peace movement during WWII, and which is still broadcasting.

I am invited to sing it at Nagaregawa Church, at ground zero in Hiroshima, two days after the 70th memorial of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, on August 8, 2015. I would like as many people as possible, all over the world to sing it, in many languages.  At Hiroshima I am singing it in English and Japanese, so I am offering the words here in both languages.

Here are the lyrics in English:

Last night I had the strangest dream
I never dreamed before
I dreamed the world had all agreed
To put an end to war.

I dreamed I saw a mighty room
The room was full of men
And the paper they were signing said
TheyÂ’d never fight again.

And when the paper all was signed
And a million copies made
They all joined hands and bowed their heads
And grateful prayers were prayed.

And the people in the streets below
Were dancing ‘round and ‘round
And swords and guns and uniforms
Were scattered on the ground.

Here is a translation of the lyrics into Japanese created by the wonderful singer/songwriter Maiko Kodama in 2013.

Last Night I had the Strangest Dream in Japanse

 

Here is a guitar chart in the key of G, the key in which I sing this song.

Last Night I Had the Strangest Dream-chart

If you are an English-speaking person, and want to learn Maiko’s Japanese lyrics phonetically, here is how they go:

Kee noh yoh roo kee myo oh nah

Last night I had the strangest dream

Yoo mei woo oh mee tah

I ev – er dreamed be fore

Sei kah ee gah seh nn soh oh

I dreamed the world had all agreed

Woh yah mei roo oo yoo mei

To put an end to war


Oh oh kee nah hei yah dei

I dreamed I saw a mighty room

Oo oh zei gah

The room was filled with men

Nee doh toh tah tah kah wah nai

And the paper they were signing said

Toh sah ee nee ee shee tah

TheyÂ’d never fight again


Nah n woh koo noh sah ee n

And when the papers all were signed

Gah koh pee ee ee sah rei

And a million copies made

Tei woh tzu nei gee ah tah mah woh sah gei

They all joined hands and bowed their heads

Ee noh ree sah sah gei tah

And grateful prayers were prayed


Too oh ree noh hee toh bee toh

And the people in the streets below

Wah oh doh ree dah shee

Were dancing round and round

Jyoo toh ken toh goon poo koo

And guns and swords and uniforms

Wah soo tei rah rei tah

Were scattered on the ground


Kee noh yoh roo kee myo oh nah

Last night I had the strangest dream

Yoo mei woo oh mee tah

I ev – er dreamed be fore

Sei kah ee gah seh nn soh oh

I dreamed the world had all agreed

Woh yah mei roo oo yoo mei

To put an end to war

2014 Japan Tour Schedule

ALAS, DUE TO AN INJURY BEFORE THE TOUR, I AM UNABLE TO TRAVEL AND PERFORM.  SO, I AM HOPING THAT, NEXT YEAR, I WILL BE ABLE TO COME AGAIN.

06/05 Concert at HAPON in Shinjuku, Tokyo, at 17:30
06-05 Hapon
http://hapon.asia/shinjuku/event/post2725/
http://www.glolea.com/event/alicia-bay-laurel-2014live.html

06/06 Concert and Talk with the staff and readers of Murmur Magazine at VACANT Art Space in Harajuku at 19:00. MurmurÂ’s editor, Hattori Millet-sanÂ’s band plays first! Then I play, then Millet-san and I talk. Tickets available at Murmur magazineÂ’s website.
3-20-13 Jingumae, Shibuya, Tokyo
Transport Harajuku station (JR Yamanote Line)
or Meiji-jingumae station (Tokyo Metro Chiyoda Line)
Telephone 03 6459 2962
URL www.n0idea.com/vacant/

vandana shiva dvd

06/08 Concert after the movie “Embracing the Seed of Life,” Keibo Shinichi Oiwa Tsuji’s interview with Vandana Shiva, and documentary of her work . Movie 15:00 to 16:00, Alicia Bay Laurel live concert and discussion from 16:00 to 17:00. At Cinema Amigo in Zushi, Kanagawa http://cinema-amigo.com/

06/14 Concert and Little Eagle Fashion Exhibition, starts at 14:00, at Cafe Jisoan, Sue, Gifu, 2000 yen.

06-14 Gifu

06/15 Concert and Little Eagle Fashion Exhibition, starts at 18:00, Mi.Ca.Li Gallery, Mino, Osaka, 2000 yen.

06-15 MiCaLi

06/17 Art Workshop with Alicia Bay Laurel: Visualization Altars with Crystals.
Starts at 15:00. 8000 yen. Meet at Under the Light Yoga School Shogakukaikan-bekkan 4F, 1-53-4, Yoyogi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 151-0053 Flier: http://holiken.net/?pid=74868539 Contact: mail@rietreat.com
Alicia's 2007 inner child shrine-web sized
Photo of Alicia Bay Laurel’s shrine “Love to My Inner Child,” made on Oshima Island, 2007.

06/17 Concert at Under the Light Yoga School Starts at 18:30, 2500 yen. Shogakukaikan-bekkan 4F, 1-53-4, Yoyogi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 151-0053

06/21 Concert (featuring Ikue Asazaki) and Little Eagle Fashion Exhibition and Fashion Show, Cafe Slow, Kokubunji, Tokyo. Starts at 19:00, seats 3800 and 4300 yen. http://www.cafeslow.com/

06-21 Cafe Slow

06-08-13-Japan-Kokubunji-Cafe Slow-Ikue Asazaki and ABL say goodnight
Photo of Ikue Asazaki and Alicia Bay Laurel at Cafe Slow, 06/08/2013

06/22 Concert and Little Eagle Fashion Exhibition and Fashion Show, Asaba Art Square, Kanazawa-Bunko, Kanagawa. Starts at 15:00. Seats: 2500 and 3000 yen, children 5 to 18, 1000 yen

06-22 Asaba

06/27 Concert and Little Eagle Fashion Exhibition, Gallery Kan, Fukushima. Start 18:30, 3000 yen.

06-27 Kan, Fukushima

06/29 Concert and Little Eagle Fashion Exhibition, Manos Garden, Hiroshima. Start 16:00, Seats 2500 and 3000 yen.

06-29 Manos Hiroshima

07/04 Concert (featuring UA) and Little Eagle Fashion Exhibition and Fashion Show, Cafe Unizon, Ginowan, Okinawa. Starts 19:00. Seats 2500 yen. http://www.cafe-unizon.jp/

07-04 Unizon

07/12 Concert and Little Eagle Fashion Exhibition at RAW CAFE by cacao?magic_ in Kyoto. Starts 19:00. Seats 2500 and 2800 yen. http://www.cacaomagic.com/

07-12 Cacao Magic

07-12 Cacao, Millet

07/13 Concert and Little Eagle Fashion Exhibition and Fashion Show at Cafe Millet, near Kyoto, Start: 14:30. 3500 yen.

07-13 Cafe Millet

07/19 Concert and Little Eagle Fashion Exhibition and Fashion Show, Bagus, Wakayama. Start 19:00. Seats: 2500 and 3000 yen http://www.wakanoura.com/bagus/

07-19 Bagus

07/21 Concert and Little Eagle Fashion Exhibition, Art Café Nafsha, Awajishima. Start 19:00. Seats 2500 yen

07-21 Nafsha

07/26 Concert with Inoue Ohana Band and hula by Miho Ogura, Alishan Organic Center, Hidaka, Saitama.
Start at 15:30. Seat and one drink: 2300 yen. 

07-27-13-Japan-Nakasakuma-Yamapara-Miho dances and Kathie, ABL and Keni play Nami, Yasu and Kensuke watch
Photo of Miho Ogura, Kathie and Keni Inoue and Alicia Bay Laurel performing together at an outdoor festival at Yamapara Organic Farm, in Nakasakuma, Chiba, on 07/27/2013.

08/02 Concert and Little Eagle Fashion Exhibition, Little Eagle Aso, Kumamoto. Start at 18:00. Seats 2000 and 2500 yen.

08-02 Aso

08/05 Concert and Little Eagle Fashion Exhibition, Daisho-in Temple, Hiroshima. Start 18:00. Tickets by donation.

08-05 Daisho-in

08/08 Concert and Little Eagle Fashion Show, Arts & Crafts Village, Okayama. Start 18:00. Seats 2500 and 3000 yen.

08-08 Okayama

08/09 Peace Concert in Hiroshima (with other musicians). Start 15:00. Location and ticket price TBA.

08-09 Peace concert